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Posted on September 16, 2016 in Crime

Tailgating Safety: ASU Is Ranked #20 for Top College Tailgates

Every college loves to celebrate its team on game days with good tailgate parties. Arizona State University ranked number 20 on the list of the top 25 college tailgates in the country. Find out how to stay safe during a tailgating party at ASU to support Sparky the Sun Devil without injuring yourself or spending the day in jail instead of on the bleachers by reviewing these tailgating safety tips.

Arizona State University’s Ranking

ASU’s tailgating hit new levels in recent years thanks to newfound success on the football field. Head Coach Todd Graham helped lead the Sun Devils to victory, instilling a sense of excitement in students and fans that translates into greater tailgating parties. The incredibly high daytime temperatures in Arizona mean that most football games don’t begin until after 7:00 p.m. This creates a unique atmosphere for game days and tailgates. Unfortunately, it also leads to greater amounts of alcohol intake, spelling trouble for public drinking laws and personal health. Therefore, it’s important to follow proper tailgating safety protocols to prevent accidents and/or injuries.

Stay Within the Law

While tailgating is completely legal in Arizona, restrictions on alcohol consumption exist. Arizona drinking laws mandate that no person under the legal drinking age of 21 can consume or be in possession of alcohol. While the law normally makes it illegal to consume alcohol in public areas like parking lots, ASU football games have amnesty for five hours leading up to the game.

Tailgaters must abide by state alcohol laws, including drinking and driving laws. It is unlawful for anyone in the state of Arizona to drive with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level of 0.08% or above. Police may arrest drivers under the age of 21 with any percentage of blood alcohol content. The rules of alcohol consumption and tailgating at ASU include the following:

  • Tailgaters can only drink within designated areas.
  • No open containers of alcohol are allowed on public streets or sidewalks.
  • No sale of alcohol or common sources of alcohol, such as kegs.
  • No hard liquor; beer and wine only.
  • No drinking games.
  • No alcohol in the stadium.
  • Glass containers are discouraged.
  • Tailgaters must clear the area within one hour of the end of the football game.

Police are largely supportive of tailgating before college games because it encourages people to drink while on location instead of drinking and then driving to the game. Tailgating also gives fans enough time for the alcohol to leave their systems before driving home. However, there are limits to the amount of alcohol a person can reasonably consume. If a fan becomes disorderly or publicly intoxicated, the police can arrest him or her regardless of the tailgating amnesty.

Take Care of Personal Health

Although games don’t start until after sundown, tailgating can begin as early as 2:00 p.m. Temperatures in Arizona often exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit around this time. In this kind of heat, tailgaters need to stay well hydrated before games. Alcohol makes the body lose more fluids than normal through increased urination and reduced ability to absorb water. This, on top of high temperatures, can easily result in dehydration. Follow tailgating safety measures by drinking water in between alcoholic beverages, and give your body time to rehydrate.

If you bring food to a tailgate party, keep meats on ice to prevent spoiled food and poisoning. Bring a fire extinguisher if you’re grilling, and cool coals properly before putting them in a garbage container. Leftover food may be tempting to bring home, but if it’s something that can spoil in the heat it’s best to throw it away. If you’re hosting a tailgate party, keep your guests safe. Ensure they abide by Arizona’s alcohol laws on and off campus, and never drink and drive.